Chippendale's Reader
Check out the central frieze on this breakfront… the oval “sunflower” design is a staple of Ince & Mayhew work. Every English antiques dealer dreams of seeing this on a period piece: Le Trianon - A Fine George III Mahogany Breakfront Cabinet attributed to Ince & Mayhew, based on a design of Robert Adam

Check out the central frieze on this breakfront… the oval “sunflower” design is a staple of Ince & Mayhew work. Every English antiques dealer dreams of seeing this on a period piece: Le Trianon - A Fine George III Mahogany Breakfront Cabinet attributed to Ince & Mayhew, based on a design of Robert Adam

I’ll just let this one speak for itself: “This extraordinary mahogany and mercury-gilded bronze bedroom suite was once owned by the last Egyptian monarch, King Farouk. Luxuriously decorated in the Empire style, this important set was crafted by one of the premier Parisian ébénistes of the 19th century, Antoine Krieger (fl. 1826-1856). The seven piece suite comprises a queen-size bed, secrétaire à abattant (drop-front secretary) with a satinwood interior, cheval mirror with side tables, two-door cabinet, vanity and two nightstands….. 
Antoine Krieger took his inspiration for this set from the furnishings of Malmaison, one of Napoleon and Josephine’s Parisian palaces. A similar bedroom suite was acquired by circus magnate John Ringling to adorn his bedroom at Ca d’Zan, now part of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida.”
MS Rau Antiques - Antoine Krieger - Egyptian King Farouk Empire Bedroom Suite

I’ll just let this one speak for itself: “This extraordinary mahogany and mercury-gilded bronze bedroom suite was once owned by the last Egyptian monarch, King Farouk. Luxuriously decorated in the Empire style, this important set was crafted by one of the premier Parisian ébénistes of the 19th century, Antoine Krieger (fl. 1826-1856). The seven piece suite comprises a queen-size bed, secrétaire à abattant (drop-front secretary) with a satinwood interior, cheval mirror with side tables, two-door cabinet, vanity and two nightstands….. 

Antoine Krieger took his inspiration for this set from the furnishings of Malmaison, one of Napoleon and Josephine’s Parisian palaces. A similar bedroom suite was acquired by circus magnate John Ringling to adorn his bedroom at Ca d’Zan, now part of the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida.”

MS Rau Antiques - Antoine Krieger - Egyptian King Farouk Empire Bedroom Suite

Love 1) the blind fretwork 2) the glow of this mahogany: Jayne Thompson Antiques - Chippendale Period Kneehole Chest

Love 1) the blind fretwork 2) the glow of this mahogany: Jayne Thompson Antiques - Chippendale Period Kneehole Chest

Le Trianon - An Important Rococo Walnut Center Table Possibly Portuguese - 1stdibs
A Pair of George II Mahogany Armchairs, circa 1760
Sneaky, sneaky cabinetmaker: “Though the maker has yet to be identified, one of the most unique features of this model is that other almost identical versions, some slightly modified to contain the coats-of-arms of their patrons, are known. The high quality of the timber and the carving indicate the work of a prominent London cabinet-maker who cleverly adapted a single design to suit the demands of his aristocratic patrons.”

A Pair of George II Mahogany Armchairs, circa 1760

Sneaky, sneaky cabinetmaker: “Though the maker has yet to be identified, one of the most unique features of this model is that other almost identical versions, some slightly modified to contain the coats-of-arms of their patrons, are known. The high quality of the timber and the carving indicate the work of a prominent London cabinet-maker who cleverly adapted a single design to suit the demands of his aristocratic patrons.”

Christie’s fall European Dec. Arts catalog is up, and there are treasures galore:
George III Mahogany “Bonheur Du Jour” attributed to John Cobb - circa 1765-1770

Christie’s fall European Dec. Arts catalog is up, and there are treasures galore:

George III Mahogany “Bonheur Du Jour” attributed to John Cobb - circa 1765-1770

Check out the carving along the frieze & canted corners… this is very well done: O’Sullivan Antiques - George III mahogany chest on chest

Check out the carving along the frieze & canted corners… this is very well done: O’Sullivan Antiques - George III mahogany chest on chest

Makes me want to read out loud: Hollis & Knight - William IV Lectern/Book Stand

Makes me want to read out loud: Hollis & Knight - William IV Lectern/Book Stand

At Hyde Park Antiques: A George IV Mahogany Diminutive Pedestal Sideboard
This is probably the strangest thing I’ve seen in a while… a primitive 19th c. tachometer. Arader Galleries - A Mahogany and Brass Waywiser, the dial signed Troughton, London
edit: I should have said "odometer" (measures distance) instead of "tachometer" (measures revolutions-per-minute). My bad. 
Also, found another example of the device with more information on it’s purpose and use, this one by Robert Bate of London. 

This is probably the strangest thing I’ve seen in a while… a primitive 19th c. tachometerArader Galleries - A Mahogany and Brass Waywiser, the dial signed Troughton, London

edit: I should have said "odometer" (measures distance) instead of "tachometer" (measures revolutions-per-minute). My bad. 

Also, found another example of the device with more information on it’s purpose and use, this one by Robert Bate of London

French Empire Double Dressing Table circa 1830.
(I’m pretty sure there’s a cut glass & bronze version of this in the Louvre…)

French Empire Double Dressing Table circa 1830.

(I’m pretty sure there’s a cut glass & bronze version of this in the Louvre…)

Mahogany Loop-back side chair, manner of Robert Manwaring England, circa 1750
I am a huge fan of the gentleman who owns Clinton Howell Antiques.
I walked into his UES gallery one afternoon in 2007, wearing a hooded sweatshirt and jeans - I was on vacation from college. I looked possibly like a thief, and most certainly looked nothing like his typical client. He treated me like I was the only person in the world, and spent more than 2 hours teaching me about recognizing various wood types and how each one normally ages, then on how to recognize various signs of quality in 18th century cabinetmakers’ construction techniques. His general intelligence and passion for the antiques trade are equaled by few people.
That said: if you have any interest in (very fine) English furniture, I highly recommend a visit to his online gallery. Also, he keeps a fantastic, well-rounded blog that can be found here.

Mahogany Loop-back side chair, manner of Robert Manwaring England, circa 1750

I am a huge fan of the gentleman who owns Clinton Howell Antiques.

I walked into his UES gallery one afternoon in 2007, wearing a hooded sweatshirt and jeans - I was on vacation from college. I looked possibly like a thief, and most certainly looked nothing like his typical client. He treated me like I was the only person in the world, and spent more than 2 hours teaching me about recognizing various wood types and how each one normally ages, then on how to recognize various signs of quality in 18th century cabinetmakers’ construction techniques. His general intelligence and passion for the antiques trade are equaled by few people.

That said: if you have any interest in (very fine) English furniture, I highly recommend a visit to his online gallery. Also, he keeps a fantastic, well-rounded blog that can be found here.

Consider this added to the ‘when I win the lottery’ list…
"Renowned for his skill in marquetry, Frederick Hintz mastered the technique developed by André-Charles Boulle in the late 17th century of using metals and precious materials to enhance the designs of fine furnishings. This type of inlay work was considered to be the epitome of furniture making, reserved only for the wealthy and affluent. This particular specimen serves as a benchmark of this fascinating craft during what is considered to be the height of English furniture making." (via MS Rau Antiques - George II Mahogany Tea Table - 1stdibs )

Consider this added to the ‘when I win the lottery’ list…

"Renowned for his skill in marquetry, Frederick Hintz mastered the technique developed by André-Charles Boulle in the late 17th century of using metals and precious materials to enhance the designs of fine furnishings. This type of inlay work was considered to be the epitome of furniture making, reserved only for the wealthy and affluent. This particular specimen serves as a benchmark of this fascinating craft during what is considered to be the height of English furniture making." (via MS Rau Antiques - George II Mahogany Tea Table - 1stdibs )